Connect ethernet cables with a match, knife, and electrical tape

Disclaimer, burning plastic could possibly not be good for your lungs. Though, there is a minimal amount in this method. Good times.

In this example, two identical Cat6 Ethernet cables are used.

First you need to cut the casing off to expose the 4 pairs of plastic-covered copper wires. I’d recommend at least an inch for this method as you have to physically twist a wire from one cable to the matching wire of the other cable.

 

 

It’s good to separate the wires into pairs so you can more easily match a wire from one cable to the same wire on the other cable. Disclaimer: Don’t do this near anything else flammable. Light one of the individual (one single wire) wires with a match or lighter on the end farthest from the casing (closest to the cut tip). It will burn quickly down the wire toward the Ethernet cable casing. Blow it out before it reaches the casing. The plastic will crumble off, leaving an exposed Ethernet cable. You may also want to hold your breath and not breath in the plastic fumes during these few seconds. The wire should look like the picture below.

 

 

Next, do the same thing to the same wire in the other cable and twist them together.

 

 

Wrap this twisted copper cable in electrical tape to cover the exposed copper. Do the same for the rest of the wires, burning off the plastic, twisting them with their duplicate on the other wire, and wrapping them in electrical tape so the exposed copper in one wire can’t touch the exposed copper in another wire. You should end up with a total of 8 twisted copper cables each individually wrapped with electrical tape. It’ll sortof look like an electrical tape flower. Fold those eight pieces down to one side (doesn’t matter if they touch because all the copper has been re-insulated with tape). Wrap the whole mess with electrical tape to hold everything in place.

 

 

I’ve tested wires I’ve made like this and they have been quite reliable. Example ping stats are below, and the connection is reliable under heavy load as well.

 

Pinging 8.8.8.8 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=41ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=30ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=30ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=40ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=29ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=32ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=31ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=34ms TTL=119
Reply from 8.8.8.8: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=119